The Home of Louis D\'Amours de Courberon as it looked in 2007

A good place to start with this branch of the family is with the McCurdie Family Genealogy.  There are great pictures here of the Wisconsin descendants of Rene-Louis D’Amours de Courberon who was killed by the British when the French lost Canada.  The descendants of Rene-Louis use the name Coulbron, Colburn and Courbron and have fanned out from Quebec to all over. 

There is an association of D’Amours Families which has publications, resources and meetings.

If you have an Ancestry.com subscription you can find a wonderful family history there as well, with pictures and stories about the family particularly the Wisconsin Branch.  I got started with Danielle LeMyre’s site which is chock full of interestingly told stories. 

I would not have gotten anywhere when I began my research on this side of the family if it had not been for the work of Marie Viens and the information that she shared with me about the Wisconsin branch and the work they had done. With her information and the availability of old newspapers from http://www.nnyln.net I was able to figure out the various Americanizations of the de Courberon name, or maybe it would be better to say “crack the code”; for Uncle Sullivan King (sometimes called the new Sullivan in these pages to distinguish him from his grandfather “Old Sullivan” had insisted that the family name was Colburn and that they were “French”.  Imagine the confusion this caused, not the least of which was figuring out how it came to be spelled that way!

Recently many original documents have been made available online which will hopefully clear up many details in the published genealogies.  Donald and Richard King have both taken an interest in this line of research and Don in particular has done an amazing job of unearthing original records and even took a trip into the old Seigneury to revisit the “family ground”.  I hope to join him there this summer and meet with many of my more distant cousins.  Cousins Richard and Marshall from the de Courberon line have been a great help to us as we link our Adirondack connections to this larger family group. 

Don and I were able to get help from the Assumption of Mary Catholic Church in Redford, NY where Louis lived and raised his family.  We are very grateful to the priest and clerk of the church for letting us photograph original records, which lead to clarifications and corrections that would not have been possible had we been restricted to the printed record.

As it turned out, once we had the correct spelling and all of the usual variants we were able to find lots of information to verify and extend our knowledge about the family history and what we found was fascinating to say the least.

The D’Amours family were French Aristocrats who came to Canada as Seigneurs.  There are two branches one from Jean-Baptiste who use the last name D’Amours, sometimes Americanized as Love, and the branch we follow most closely here which uses the D’Amours de Courberon last name, Americanized (as mentioned above) as Coulbron, Colburn and Courbron.

The story of this family is as complex as any, and deeply rooted in the history of both France and its endeavors in the New World.  It is a story of conquest, revolution and the loss of noble status in the New World and the social devastation and opportunities caused by these changes.

Along the way this family has given us some great stories to tell; a pirate, an Indian Chief, a military leader fighting George Washington, a femme fatale, a French Canadian Patriot who died defending Quebec, a lost estate, and failed revolutionaries who fled to the U.S. to begin again.

There are a number of DeCourberon connections in the Chazy Lake families through the marriages of the many girls in this family, these will be covered in other entries and pages.

All in all those of us working on this project are grateful to all of our sources, fellow researchers and cousins for the good work they have done and their generosity in sharing it with us so that we can bring it to our readers.

 

 

 

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